Government ‘achieves three out of ten on energy security commitments’

Staff
By Staff
3 Min Read

Analysis suggests that the government has only fulfilled three out of ten commitments it made two years ago to enhance the UK’s energy security.

The Energy and Climate Intelligence Unit (ECIU) conducted an analysis revealing shortcomings in the UK Government’s energy security commitments.

The think tank suggests that the government has only achieved three out of ten major targets outlined in its strategy, two years after the publication of the British Energy Security Strategy.

According to the report, key areas of concern include offshore wind farm auctions and heat pump policies, where the government has failed to meet targets.

Despite commitments, only two new offshore wind farms have been secured since the strategy’s inception, with none secured in the last auction in 2023.

Delays in implementing the Clean Heat Market Mechanism have also hindered efforts to bolster heat pump adoption, the ECIU suggests.

In addition, analysts argue that the government’s focus on expanding North Sea oil and gas drilling may not yield significant benefits.

Commenting on the analysis, Jess Ralston, Energy Analyst at the ECIU, said: “The UK has had two energy security strategies within two years and we’re still going backwards, becoming more dependent on foreign imports.

“As a country, we have spent more than £100bn on gas over the crisis with the bill payer and taxpayer bearing the brunt.”

A Department for Energy Security and Net Zero spokesperson told Energy Live News: “We do not accept these claims.

“Since we published the British Energy Security Strategy we have allocated billions to improve energy efficiency, announced a dedicated record pot of £800 million to back offshore wind projects and increased our heat pump grant to £7,500 – making it one of the most generous schemes in Europe and helping families with costs.

“We have achieved all this while maintaining one of the most secure and diverse energy systems in the world, with renewables now accounting for nearly half of our electricity – up from 7% in 2010 – while backing a domestic oil and gas supply and ending the stop-start approach to nuclear.”

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